Previous This may sound awful, but I saw our invasion of Iraq in 2003, in which I was to play a role, as an important photographic opportunity to document war from the viewpoint of medical caregivers at the front line of combat.  Bryan Moore, a captain and a nurse, is one of the most empathetic, caring and compassionate persons I have ever had the honor of knowing.  He laid down during battle and gave his own blood directly to a dying Iraqi soldier, saving his life.  Here, he is caring for a pregnant woman who had been shot through the belly by Iraqi forces.  At this point the baby was still viable, but I don't know the final outcome for either of them.  What strikes me about this image, besides the incredible compassion that he demonstrates, is the figure behind him.  It is as if a spirit is there with him, guiding him and, by extension, all of us in that tent where we saw so much death and misery.  I view this as my most important photograph to date. Next

This may sound awful, but I saw our invasion of Iraq in 2003, in which I was to play a role, as an important photographic opportunity to document war from the viewpoint of medical caregivers at the front line of combat. Bryan Moore, a captain and a nurse, is one of the most empathetic, caring and compassionate persons I have ever had the honor of knowing. He laid down during battle and gave his own blood directly to a dying Iraqi soldier, saving his life. Here, he is caring for a pregnant woman who had been shot through the belly by Iraqi forces. At this point the baby was still viable, but I don't know the final outcome for either of them. What strikes me about this image, besides the incredible compassion that he demonstrates, is the figure behind him. It is as if a spirit is there with him, guiding him and, by extension, all of us in that tent where we saw so much death and misery. I view this as my most important photograph to date.