Minidoka War Relocation Center
 
The Empire of Japan declared war on the United States by attacking Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.  Shortly thereafter, military advisors convinced President Franklin D. Roosevelt that the Japanese living in the U.S., including naturalized citizens, were security threats.  On February 19, 1942 FDR signed Executive Order 9066 which gave the Secretary of War authority to create "military zones," from which citizens could be excluded.  
 
Within two weeks entire familes of Japanese people, most of whom were U.S. citizens, were removed from their homes and initially sent to "assembly centers."  These often were simply animal stables or storage facilities at fairgrounds or race tracks, which housed the detainees until camps could be constructed.  Construction was hasty, utilizing green wood, which subsequently shrank as it dried and created air leaks.  The buildings were simply clad with black tar paper.  After a few building were built the government began to move people in where they were forced to complete construction of the camps.  Ten such camps were built.  Minidoka received people from Washington, Oregon and Alaska.
 
From the NPS website:  "Minidoka was constructed on Bureau of Reclamation land which was designed to turn the high desert of Idaho into arable farmland. The entire camp extended over 33,000 acres, although only 900 acres were used as residential areas. The rest was used for administration and agricultural purposes. Minidoka had 36 residential blocks. Each block had 12 barracks, a mess hall, and a latrine. Each barrack was 120’x 20’, which was then divided into six units. Each unit would house a family or a group of individuals. Each unit had a single lightbulb and a coal burning stove. The walls dividing the units did not extend to the ceiling and the barracks had no insulation. There was little to no privacy for anyone. 

"The latrines were in an “H” shaped building with men on one side and women on the other, separated by the laundry area. The bathrooms, however, were simply a row of toilets and a row of showers with no partitions. For women, privacy was a major issue. The lack of partitions led to health issues that continued until partitions were built in the women’s bathroom area."
 
Later, following Congressional investigation of the internments with findings that, "the exclusion and forced imprisonment of Japanese Americans by the US government was based on the false premise of military necessity," Congress passed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988.
 
Minidoka is one of the few remaining internment camps.  It stands as a reminder of how societies can over react to events and become xenophobic, using rationalization based on fear to violate the very principles upon which the country was founded.  I remember as a boy being told that the camps were created to "protect" the Japanese people, and I perpetuated this myth well into adulthood. But these were Americans and the United States was their country.  They were not part of Japanese aggression in Asia.  Many of these Americans served in the war against Japan.
 
The internment faded from my consciousness until 9/11, at which time we once again were challenged to not over react and to not violate our basic values. 
 
Unfortunately, recent years have seen the erosion of those and other values upon which our nation was founded.  A visit to Minidoka, and a conversation with a very brave, kind and compassionate woman reminded me of the importance of maintaining our high standards and ideals.  It also reminded me that among the greatest of human characteristics is kindness and mercy toward others.
 
 
 
 
Fujiko Tamura Gardner was 10 years old in 1942 when her family was uprooted from their home in Washington and relocated to the Minidoka War Relocation Center, also known as Hunt Camp to the locals in Idaho.  The relocation was a result of Executive Order 9066, signed by President Roosevelt, on February 19, 1942, a date the that Japanese Americans now remember as "a national day of remembrance."  On February 22, 2020, Mrs. Gardner  kindly took visitors to the Minidoka National Historic Site on a tour and explained what it was like to be removed from their homes and imprisoned for 3 years.   : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Fujiko Tamura Gardner was 10 years old in 1942 when her family was uprooted from their home in Washington and relocated to the Minidoka War Relocation Center, also known as Hunt Camp to the locals in Idaho. The relocation was a result of Executive Order 9066, signed by President Roosevelt, on February 19, 1942, a date the that Japanese Americans now remember as "a national day of remembrance." On February 22, 2020, Mrs. Gardner kindly took visitors to the Minidoka National Historic Site on a tour and explained what it was like to be removed from their homes and imprisoned for 3 years.
Fujiko stands outside Buiding 22, which was next to her building (21) that no longer stands.  The buildings were clad simply with black tar paper (distant building), not the wooden siding seen here. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Fujiko stands outside Buiding 22, which was next to her building (21) that no longer stands. The buildings were clad simply with black tar paper (distant building), not the wooden siding seen here.
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Fujiko speaks with two other people of Japanese descent.  Fujiko wants to, "make sure what happened to us so many years ago will never happen again." : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Fujiko speaks with two other people of Japanese descent. Fujiko wants to, "make sure what happened to us so many years ago will never happen again."
Fujiko points to the crack between the window and the sill, where cold air would blow in during long winters.  The buildings had only 3 stoves for 6 apartments, each of which housed an extended family.  The buildings had no running water and there was only one separate toilet facility with no inner walls for privacy.  The toilets were simple latrines initially, until plumbing was installed later. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Fujiko points to the crack between the window and the sill, where cold air would blow in during long winters. The buildings had only 3 stoves for 6 apartments, each of which housed an extended family. The buildings had no running water and there was only one separate toilet facility with no inner walls for privacy. The toilets were simple latrines initially, until plumbing was installed later.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Baseball was one of the few recreational opportunities for internees.  This is the backstop for the field.  The new visitors center is the building on top of the rise. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Baseball was one of the few recreational opportunities for internees. This is the backstop for the field. The new visitors center is the building on top of the rise.
Baseball was one of the few recreational opportunities for internees. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Baseball was one of the few recreational opportunities for internees.
Baseball was one of the few recreational opportunities for internees. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Baseball was one of the few recreational opportunities for internees.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.

Buildings were clad in black tar paper.  These buildings were divided into six apartments, which held families up to 8. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. Buildings were clad in black tar paper. These buildings were divided into six apartments, which held families up to 8.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Silhouettes of modern visitors are ghostly surrogates of detainees 78 years ago. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Silhouettes of modern visitors are ghostly surrogates of detainees 78 years ago.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
A view out of a window in Barracks 22.  The field was once filled with other buildings.  Minidoka War Relocation Center was the 7th largest city in Idaho. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
A view out of a window in Barracks 22. The field was once filled with other buildings. Minidoka War Relocation Center was the 7th largest city in Idaho.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho.  On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S.  Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets.  The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war.  Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance."  The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Only a few buildings from the Minidoka War Relocation Center remain intact at the Minidoka National Historic Site near Jerome, Idaho. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, ordering the removal of all Japanese Americans (Nikkei) from their homes and relocation to one of several camps hastily constructed around the U.S. Initially, these camps lacked basic services such as flushing toilets. The incarcerated endured, some even enlisting in the armed services to serve in the war. Many people today commemorate February 19 as a "national day of remembrance." The Minidoka National Historic Site opened a new visitor's center on February 22, 2020.
Root cellar for storage of potatoes and other produce. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Root cellar for storage of potatoes and other produce.
This irrigation ditch served the water needs for internees during much of the year, including a small swimming hole. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
This irrigation ditch served the water needs for internees during much of the year, including a small swimming hole.
Guard tower at the camp entrance. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Guard tower at the camp entrance.
Guard tower at entrance to the camp. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Guard tower at entrance to the camp.
In in order to serve their country, many internees chose to serve in the armed forces, ironically to fight for the same government that had imprisoned them and their families. They are immortalized on this plaque at the entrance to the camp. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
In in order to serve their country, many internees chose to serve in the armed forces, ironically to fight for the same government that had imprisoned them and their families. They are immortalized on this plaque at the entrance to the camp.
In in order to serve their country, many internees chose to serve in the armed forces, ironically to fight for the same government that had imprisoned them and their families. They are immortalized on this plaque at the entrance to the camp. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
In in order to serve their country, many internees chose to serve in the armed forces, ironically to fight for the same government that had imprisoned them and their families. They are immortalized on this plaque at the entrance to the camp.
Guard house at entrance to the camp. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Guard house at entrance to the camp.
Guard house at entrance to the camp. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Guard house at entrance to the camp.
Open farmland cultivated by the Minidoka internees from 1942 to 1945. : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
Open farmland cultivated by the Minidoka internees from 1942 to 1945.
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM
 : Minidoka : TIMOTHY FLOYD PHOTOGRAPHER, NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, PHOTO ESSAYS, PHOTOJOURNALISM